Introduction of Ubud

For a thorough exploration of Balinese culture and tradition — and a good dose of comfort and quiet — Ubud is the place. Though unabashedly touristic, the town is the cultural pulse of the island, the richest region in Bali for art production, and the very reason why so many expat artists and collectors have made Bali their home. Ubud has a royal legacy and hosts the Royal Palace, a center for cultural performances and dance. In and among the smaller streets of town, you’ll find refined boutiques, chic galleries, and cool trinket shops, alongside open-air cafes that swallow passersby on lazy days. Outside the busy town labyrinth, the phosphorescent rice paddies, virgin jungle, gorges, and river valleys of this hilly Shangri-la are ripe
for exploration. Ubud’s central location makes the whole island accessible as a day trip. About the only thing it doesn’t have is a beach, but they’re all a short drive away.

PLACE OF INTEREST:

Museums

Ubud is arguably the best place to use as a base if you’re visiting Bali; if you’re looking for culture, comfort, nature and inspiration. Ubud is surrounded by most of the things that bring people to Bali — scenic rice fields, small villages, art and craft communities, ancient temples, palaces, rivers, museum and traditional market. Some 25 kilometres from Denpasar and its central location makes it easy to get from Ubud to the mountains, beaches, and major towns.
The centre of Balinese painting, Ubud’s Museum “Puri Lukisan” has a permanent collection of modern works of Balinese art dating from the turn of the century. There are also several art galleries and homes of famous artists here, including that of Dutch born Hans Snel and Spanish Antonio Blanco. The “Young artist” style now popular in Balinese painting was introduced by the Dutch painter Arie Smith. In the past, other foreign painters inspired Balinese artists to adopt western techniques but traditional Balinese paintings are still made and sold another museum called “Neka Museum” has a wide collection of paintings both by Indonesian as well as foreign artists who used to live in Bali.

 

Palaces

Ubud is arguably the best place to use as a base if you’re visiting Bali; if you’re looking for culture, comfort, nature and inspiration. Ubud is surrounded by most of the things that bring people to Bali — scenic rice fields, small villages, art and craft communities, ancient temples, palaces, rivers, museum and traditional market. Some 25 kilometres from Denpasar and its central location makes it easy to get from Ubud to the mountains, beaches, and major towns.
Ubud has been a “royal town” for over a hundred years. Its princes, who bear the title “Tjokorda” or “Agung” still live in traditional palaces, called “Puri’s”. Be aware, however, that every place called “puri” is not a royal palace.
The word has been used quite liberally of late. Also be aware that there is not one palace in Ubud, but many, most of them clustered around the main cross-roads near the Ubud market.
There are several other “royal” towns in the Ubud area, too, with their own palaces, most of which have close family ties to the Ubud Tjokorda’s. A web of connections is maintained by incidental and arranged marriages among the respective offspring of princes in Sayan, Pejeng, Singapadu, Peliatan, and Payangan’s puri’s.

 

Traditional Market

Ubud is arguably the best place to use as a base if you’re visiting Bali; if you’re looking for culture, comfort, nature and inspiration. Ubud is surrounded by most of the things that bring people to Bali — scenic rice fields, small villages, art and craft communities, ancient temples, palaces, rivers, museum and traditional market. Some 25 kilometres from Denpasar and its central location makes it easy to get from Ubud to the mountains, beaches, and major towns.
It’s located in the centre of Ubud and offers the variety local food with morning prices…
If you’re staying within the Ubud area, then don’t forget to drop by at the Ubud Traditional Market at Monkey Forest Street, right in front of Ubud’s Palace. Just like any other traditional market, its tenants provide every souvenir item imaginable, from silver jewellery, and precious stones to batiks, T-shirts, beach sarongs, wood carvings, and cane work bags. Each stall is packed with goodies; some items are even hung from the ceilings. Since it’s a traditional market, expect crammed allies and unusual smells every now and then.